Citizens Bond Committee delivers recommendation on Bond proposal to Board of Trustees

Please note the change in location: Thursday’s meeting will be held at Deerpark Middle School.

Following months of work and thousands of hours volunteered by dedicated Round Rock ISD parents and stakeholders, the leadership of the Citizens Bond Committee presented its final recommendation to the Board of Trustees in a meeting Thursday. (Watch the meeting.)

CBC Chair Kris Parker began the presentation by thanking the hundreds of citizens who participated on the committee, stressing the organic, citizen-led process and outlining the key discussions the committee focused on, including:

  • Existing Facility Conditions
  • Demographics and Enrollment Projections
  • School Finance
  • Bonding Capacity & Impact of Potential Bond
  • Building Needs, Potential Solutions & Cost Analysis

She also emphasized the growth the District has experienced—and continues to see—and its impact on facilities and students’ educational experience. Round Rock ISD currently serves more than 48,900 students and is the 21st largest district in Texas, out of more than 1,200 districts. In the past 10 years, RRISD has grown by approximately 7,400 students and is projected to surpass 52,800 students in the next 10 years.

Ultimately, the committee identified more than $800 million in needs, but narrowed their recommendation to three potential bond packages:

  • Package #1: $521.7 million
    • $125.4 million for Districtwide projects
    • $253.1 million for Growth projects (Including a new high school)
    • $143.2 million for Capital Renewal and Replacement projects
  • Package #2: $586.7 million
    • $125.4 million for Districtwide projects
    • $318.1 million for Growth projects (Including funding Westwood High Phase 4, McNeil High Phase 2, and a new high school.)
    • $143.2 million for Capital Renewal and Replacement projects
  • Package #3: $429.5 million
    • $125.4 million for Districtwide projects
    • $160.9 million for Growth projects (Including funding Westwood High Phase 4, McNeil High Phase 2, and funding site and design work for a future new high school.)
    • $143.2 million Capital Renewal and Replacement projects

Districtwide projects include categories such as safety and security, playgrounds, technology, transportation, fine arts and athletic facilities, and career and technical education. Growth projects are intended to relieve crowded schools by building new classrooms or potentially new campuses. Capital Renewal and Replacement projects run the gamut from replacing aging heating and air conditioning systems and roofs, to renovating and modernizing old facilities with a focus on safety issues and providing equity across the district.

Full presentation, with details on each package.

The Board of Trustees will meet on Tuesday (August 7) and Thursday (August 9) beginning at 5:30 p.m. to hear public input and further discuss a potential bond proposal. Members of the public will have the opportunity to comment between 5:30 and 6:45 p.m. Tuesday’s meeting will be held at Cedar Ridge High School and Thursday’s will be at Deerpark Middle School and the meetings will be livestreamed. Meeting agendas will be posted on the Board Docs website. Trustees must vote to call for the bond by August 20 for it to be on the November ballot.

CBC Chair Parker said she is hopeful the Board will ultimately develop a Bond proposal the community can support, citing pressing needs that need to be addressed.

“We cannot afford the non-passage of another bond. We’ve already had a five year lapse before this bond would even take effect,” Parker said. “We as a community and as citizens need to all come forward together and advocate on behalf of our future leaders. Our students are worth it.”

Information on School District Bonds
School districts can only sell bonds if authorization is received by voters. A bond is a debt instrument in which an investor loans money to the District. The proceeds from the bond are used to finance capital projects and other long term items. The District repays the principal of the bonds, along with interest, over a period of time.
According to Texas Education Code, bond proceeds can be used for the construction, acquisition, and renovation of school buildings, the acquisition of land and the purchase of capital equipment such as technology and school buses.

Under current Texas laws, the maximum maturity of a bond is 40 years. However, the maximum maturity ever issued by Round Rock ISD is 25 years, even though projects financed by the bonds have a longer life than 25 years. Assets financed by the bonds that have a shorter asset life, are sold with shorter maturities that align with their useful life.


FAQs on bonds and how the impact Round Rock ISD can be found on the
 CBC website.